Smart Phone Use and Addiction

A number of schools are implementing policy that prevents students from accessing their phones during the school day with the goal of increasing positive engagement with peers and and staff and decreasing distraction from learning. An interesting article that highlights when use develops into addiction.

https://www.cnn.com/2019/10/20/asia/smartphone-addiction-camp-intl-hnk-scli/index.html?no-st=1571921467

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It’s exciting to watch the transformation of this school for students and educators. I truly appreciate the self-reflection of the administrator as well as the thoughtful planning for student as well as staff supports. We can all get there.

https://www.edutopia.org/article/evolution-trauma-informed-school

Smart Phone Use and Addiction

The January and February Middle School Social Emotional Wellness Snapshots focus on on line behaviour and gaming. Some district schools have put policy in place to prevent students from accessing their smart phones during the school day to reduce distraction from learning and also increase positive communication and interactions with peers and teachers.

https://www.cnn.com/2019/10/20/asia/smartphone-addiction-camp-intl-hnk-scli/index.html?no-st=1571921467

Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus you own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.